Useful Tips

Activate user Root on Mac OS X

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When switching to El Capitan, a number of users encountered access rights issues - broken sudo, incorrect timezone, etc ...

The root of evil is reduced access to / private / etc.

For starters, you should check yours. Open Terminal (this can be done through Spotlight) and enter ls -la / private.


Like this "Drwxr-xr-x" and the rights to etc. If they look more like "Drwx -----"then you to us.

It would seem - just something to do - restore access rights: Spotlight -> DiskUtility -> FirstAid ... and where is Repair Permission now?

As it turned out, this option is no longer available through the GUI.

However, as Google tells us (for example, osxdaily.com/2015/11/04/verify-repair-permissions-mac-os-x), this can still be done via the command line:

Thus, all we need to restore sudo is ... a working sudo! Somewhat ironic, isn't it?

Nevertheless, there is a way out.

In order to fix the rights it is necessary:

1. log in as a user with administrator rights
2. access the user root
3. change permissions on the folder / private / etc

1. log in as a user with administrator rights
With the first paragraph, I will not help you. If your account already has administrator rights, use it. If not, find your administrator.

2. access the user root

In order to access root run the application Directory Utility. I would recommend opening it through Spotlight.

After starting the program, click on the lock and enter your user password so that “Directory Utility” allows you to make changes.

Go to the menu Edit. If you have item “Enable Root User” start with it. If instead of this point you see "Disable Root User"then choose immediately “Change Root Password. "

Enter the password and repeat it for control. Decent people do not use for root the same password as for your regular user.

3. change permissions on the folder / private / etc

Run Terminal (this, again, can be done through Spotlight).
Enter command su.

When you enter this command, the system will ask you for a password. Password must be entered root user. The one that you installed in the second step, and not your regular password.


If you entered it correctly, then you will see a command prompt with a grid at the end. Sort of:


So, we are just one step away from success. It remains to change the access rights and check the result. To change the rights, use the command "Chmod aug + rx / private / etc". To check the result - ls -la / private

Turn on the user's Root on Mac OS X:

1) On the desktop, press the combination “Command + Shift + G”, a folder transition line will open. Here we enter: "/ System / Library / CoreServices /".

2) In the folder Core services find and run Directory service.

3) In the Directory Service, click on "Castle»In order to allow changes and enter the Administrator password, if asked.

4) Next, in the top line of the menu, select the “Edit” item and in the drop-down window click on the “Enable root user».

5) Set a good password for the Root user account.

*The password can be changed using Terminal by entering the command “sudo passwd”. You can also use the Directory Service to change the root password..

Now you have at your disposal Root access in OS X. This account will not be displayed in the standard "Users and Groups" section in the settings. With Root, you use full access to all Mac OS X information and files, as well as the ability to delete or modify system files. We strongly recommend that you set a complex password for this account to avoid possible risk from the outside.

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